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Glitter Glamper Becomes a Reality!

The ONLY thing photoshopped here is the logo decal…I’ll likely order a decal like this for now (I already have them on my storage trailer), but hope to have a real neon sign made down the road that can be hung on the outside while “open,” and then stowed away when driving!

If you’re a fan and follower of our Glitter Glamper on social media, you’ll know that on September 25th I took a huge leap of faith and purchased the REAL, live Glitter Glamper! Why was this such a huge leap of faith, you ask? After all, the Glitter Glamper was a raging success it’s first year at the Minnesota State Fair, and my concept had been proven beyond my wildest dreams without even having a physical Glamper yet! Well, as we all know, we are in the midst of a global pandemic, which has put a screeching halt to the event industry, and in turn, nearly all of my income, making it a big financial risk to take on the hope that “someday soon” we’d be back to “somewhat normal” life! Here are some of the factors that nudged me just far enough to put what’s left of my money where my now slightly shaky confidence was:

  1. With virtually all of my events cancelled since March, I had a little more TIME on my hands to work on a big project.
  2. With no income stream in sight for most of 2020, this may be a good year to create tax deductions!
  3. We WILL eventually get past Covid. Events WILL eventually come back. But in the meantime, even if they don’t come back with the volume they once were for a long time, having the ability to go mobile and set up “shop” outdoors at an event, where I can easily control the number of people within that 6′ radius at a time and sanitize as needed, is a huge plus! People may not be able to book a large indoor gathering for a while, but being able to spread out outdoors opens up unique covid-friendly opportunities.
  4. My current space at the state fair is inside a “cage” type booth, but even if they don’t have an outdoor space for this trailer in the near future, it can still be utilized at events around the Twin Cities. And, it MIGHT actually fit INSIDE my current “cage” space…hmm…I’m exploring possibilities. 😉
  5. I can’t leave out the fact that my husband has a much more stable job than I, which sustains us and our cost of living even during a pandemic…so I fully realize that I am incredibly fortunate and privileged in that respect. If my business fails, we won’t be on the streets (or crammed in the Glamper), and that is the one thing that gives me the ability to do these crazy things!

Essentially, I had decided even while working in an awesome and successful state fair booth last year, that I didn’t come this far only to come this far.

While I moved very fast on this purchase as soon as I saw it on Facebook marketplace, it was not an impulse decision. I have been researching and searching steadily for probably over 2 years. I knew from the beginning that I wanted a Shasta Airflyte. This is evident by the business cards I created, and Photoshopped rendering of what I wanted my booth to look like for the State Fair’s application. I knew I wanted one that was manufactured between 1961 (the year that Shasta started their iconic “wings”) and 1964 (when they moved their body design from the classic “canned ham” shape to a more boxy design). At least 12′ long would be ideal, and under 20′ for ease of pulling and squeezing into festivals. A bathroom would probably be impossible, but would be a major plus if I ever were to sleep over in it at a weekend event. I had seen plenty of vintage trailers that “would have worked,” but held out for that elusive dream. I spent countless hours killing time, scrolling through Facebook Marketplace and Craigslist. I knew what was out there, what they were going for, and how much work I’d be getting into.

I got a little more serious when Covid hit, but still was starting to get to the point where I didn’t think what I had in my mind’s eye would ever become available, at least in my state or budget. But, just as things always work out the way they should, the wrong deals fell through and along the way made it so that I knew this was THE one when it turned up. Just when I was ready to settle for something other than a Shasta which also fell through (no title), and then let the whole idea go entirely and move on, I found it! The day before I went to pick it up I even got a call from a prospective client who was wondering if I really had a real camper that I could park at their curb for a covid friendly party. Um…please hold for just one day, haha!

Yes, I’m wearing tiny earrings with tiny red & white campers. Hehe!

I have a LOT of catching up to do on the progress of this thing on my blog, so I’m starting with some of the bigger things I’ve worked on so far, and will be sharing a lot more in upcoming posts!

So, back in September I purchased this 1963 Shasta! It really had everything I was hoping for, even an elusive bathroom! The bathroom is suuuper teeny, but it was a wish list item in the event that I ever take this trailer to a weekend festival or fair somewhere and spend the night in it, enabling me to work at an event out of town and save money on lodging. The goal here is to have a camper that embodies my “Glitter Glamper” brand, that functions for the work I want to do in it, and still remains camp-able. Another huge plus with this one was that it wan’t totally falling apart, the floor wasn’t rotting and in need of total replacement (we already went through that with our family camper and I did NOT want to tackle a floor again), it was clean and cute and mostly original! The exterior does not match my imagined turquoise on my business graphics, however, I have decided to stick with red and white. Red is my favorite color, I love how much bolder and eye catching this combination is (which is important for a business), and it gives me future potential to rent it out as a photographer’s backdrop for holiday photos! Later on I’ll show you the history of layered paint jobs on this thing, but for now, here’s where I started…

Interior the day I bought it! The tiny bathroom is in the back right corner closet.
This is the front dinette, which will become my main work space.

After some research in my vintage Shasta Facebook groups I learned that what I have here is not actually an Airflyte, but a Shasta 16-SC. (Ariflytes apparently didn’t come with the bathroom!) The 16 I believe refers to the length, as it is 16 feet bumper to hitch. No worries though…I wasn’t married to the Airflyte model as much as I was married to those WINGS! (Which I don’t believe are original on mine…I’ll tackle that later!)

We had a family camping trip planned for the same day that I bought this, so it was tough to bring it home, park it, and then scramble to head out of town and leave it behind! Needless to say, I couldn’t wait to get back home and get to work! The first thing I did was curtains! I know, probably the least important thing…but this is something I knew I could do quickly and make a big visual impact for very little money! I found the shiniest fancy fabric at a local fabric warehouse, and crocheted overly dramatic tiebacks using glittery yarn and hanging crystals! Do you expect anything less for the Glamper? I think not!

Crocheted tiebacks, as blingy as possible, haha!
New, shiny curtains that scream “Glitter Glamper!”
Of course I have my “Friends of the Fair” decal on the window!

Since September I’ve been working on it a little almost every day, racing against the clock and Minnesota’s impending winter to do as much as I can before it has to be put away for winter! The most immediate things that had to be done were really just sealing up cracks and crevices to keep mice out over winter, however, I really wanted to get it looking like the GLAMPER and not your average camper, as much as possible, so that it would be as ready as possible for events come spring. In order to actually physically WORK out of this camper though, I really needed to make space for a work station and chair space for customers.

We got a freak October snowfall this year…it’s gone now, but this shot was enough for me to agree that she must remain red & white…this is just SCREAMING to be set up for Christmas photo shoots!!

Time to start some of the dreaded DEMO!

I decided to remove the dinette to make my work area. While I originally figured I’d have to buy a camper in much worse shape and gut it, this one is really beautiful inside and original. SO, my goal has now become to make this camper be what I need it to be for my work and deliver the full Glitter Glamper experience, but still preserve as much of it’s original design as possible. For this reason I very carefully removed the dinette and have saved all of the original pieces, should I want to ever convert it back to a camper just for camping. (I currently have my state fair booth components tucked away in a storage trailer, so I was able to squeak these parts into the trailer for now)

Pulling out the dinette served another purpose though, to remove the front wood panel which had some rot to take care of, and access the front left corner where pervious owners had hit a deer. This corner was pretty beaten up…not too bad looking from outside but once I removed the booth I could see daylight through the floor, could crumble pieces of the framing with my fingers, and could actually reach my hand down to the ground if I wanted to. Not a hole I would want to leave open for winter! It also greatly compromised the structure itself.

These old Shastas were constructed surprisingly poorly back then. The framing is not one nice, solid, curved piece of wood, but rather, these are made with a bunch of little pieces of wood stapled together to form the curves. If you were to pull the siding off of the outside of a Shasta, what you’d see would look much like something pieced together from the scrap bin. I learned this, among many other things, from the vintage Shasta owner Facebook groups I’m in! So, between the rot and the deer damage, there was really nothing attaching the front left corner of the trailer to the walls or floor. The front panel of aluminum was actually flopping loose as well, once I took the booth out!

Removing the booth, piece by piece! I saved all the original wood facing, cushions, platform and tabletops in my Glamper storage trailer if I ever want to put it back.
After removing the whole booth and the front wood panel which had rot in the corners. Luckily the rot had not spread to anywhere else!
Removing the damaged and rotted wood. I didn’t even have to cut anything here…that is how long the original piece was.

Gah! This part is ugly! Time for a “pretty” break!!!

Okay, so far this is probably the ugliest piece of the whole project…and was a little daunting. I admit that to keep motivated and keep my eyes on the prize, I had to occasionally turn my gaze back to the other side of the camper, look at the parts that didn’t need replacing, and sprinkle in a few more creative mini-projects. I do this a lot in work and life in general…I often bounce from one thing to the next. It helps me get through the boring parts of business ownership like accounting and paperwork while still keeping motivated with the creative, artistic side! 😉

I painted and blinged out several small mirrors to hang in the Glamper!
Hanging mini LED lights, and setting up some fun accessories from my state fair booth! The afghan my grandma made and happens to match perfectly, and I found the mermaid sequin pillow at a thrift store!
I bought this wood sign at a thrift store years ago. It fit perfectly above the door (after removing a little spice rack that was not original to the camper), so I coated it in glitter and stuck it up there!

Okay, let’s go back to the dirty work….

So, I set to work pushing out the dent as much as I could, cutting new wood to replace the rotted and crumbling pieces that had broken in the collision, re-attaching the aluminum siding from the outside, re-attaching the framing to the floor itself, filling up any remaining cracks with rodent-resistent spray foam & caulk.

Removing old wood
Replacing with fresh wood
Closing up the wall after filling gaps and insulation

Removing the booth, of course, left me with a patch of unfinished floor. I’m still thinking about what I want to do with the final floor surface, but in the meantime I needed to at least bring the newly exposed floor up so it sits flush with the rest of the newer sub floor that the previous owner had put in. This involved scraping off the original tile to expose the original subfloor, and putting in a new piece.

Removing old, loose, curling tile with a chisel
After I cleaned the subfloor and cut a new piece, I laid down some construction adhesive.
New floor laid down and ready for screws! Now the floor matches up with the rest of the floor, so I can decide what to do with tile.
Now to find a fresh piece of birch paneling to close up the front wall!

Now that the deer hole/dent is fixed and everything is secure and stable, and the floor is all level, I just need to find some 1/8″ birch paneling or plywood (tougher to find than you’d think!) to close up that front wall, and can get to work finishing the floor and building a work station that will sit over the water tank! So this left corner is where my customer will sit in a tall chair, and the right corner is where my paint/glitter kit will sit!

Honestly I’m thankful that this was all I had to pull out…so many of these trailers seem to have a little rot, then when you pull off a panel it reveals a major problem requiring a complete frame-up rebuild! My husband is going to help re-attach the water pump and re-route the water, and we’ll do a bunch of electrical work. Now I just need to land on a flooring solution…fill in this space with the existing tile, or replace the whole camper with something…GLITTERY?

Okay, this was a long post with a bunch of things I’ve been working on earlier on in the process…next time I’ll share some more of the fun cosmetic things I’ve done! Stay tuned!!

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Are You A Potato or an Egg?

Are you a potato, or an egg?

One of the best things about being my own boss, is that for the most part, I get to decide what I want to do, and when to do it. I can choose to take a gig or pass it on to someone else. I can decide to do more of what fills me up, and less of what doesn’t. Most self employed artists embrace and understand this, though when times get tough, we tend to forget some of our superpowers. Like we can choose to pick ourselves back up, or choose to wallow in self pity.

Lately I have seen so many of my fellow artists in one of two camps. One group is doing everything they can to remain positive, in the face of crippling financial hardship. They are using their newfound free time to do good and spread positivity, controlling what they can and letting go of what they can’t.

The other is curling up into a ball in their hole of despair, making comments like “well, I guess I’ll never paint again.” or “everything I’ve ever worked for is now completely worthless.”

I know that the state of the world is absolutely devastating to the core of us who rely on a thriving event industry for our bread & butter. My business of 25 years has come to a 100% screeching halt just like the rest of yours. What puts me into group #1, however, is that I have not given up my I’m-my-own-boss power. I am using it to not only decide whether to work in my pj’s today, but to decide that my circumstances don’t create my joy.

No, I’m not happy that I have no gigs in the foreseeable future. I am not happy that nobody else does either, and as a result nobody is ordering supplies from my shop. No, I’m not happy that my credit card debt is going to grow, and my income will not fund any family fun this summer. I’m not happy that my birthday was spent in quarantine. I’m not happy that my dad had a stroke right before the “stuff” hit the fan, and nobody is allowed to visit him in the hospital. I’m not happy, no, but I am joyful and that is what keeps me going.

I love this definition of happiness vs joy that I found via Google search:

Happiness may dwell on materialistic, worldly pleasure while joy is derived from soul satisfying, emotional well being.”

-diffen.com

What satisfies your soul? For me, it is absolutely my faith. I can’t imagine how people can get through things like this without it. For a lot of us, especially artists, it is also doing what we love to do…what we were created to do!

If you’re having trouble finding any positives in your current situation, try gratitude…yes…in ALL circumstances. Challenge yourself to find something to be thankful for every day. Sometimes a perspective shift is in order.

  • I’m thankful that I’m now forced to snuggle my boys & watch movies on my couch, while so many health care workers now can’t be close to or hug their own kids.
  • I’m thankful that I still have my talents, and can use them for so much more than my income.
  • I’m thankful that I don’t live in an abusive home
  • I’m thankful for Amazon, and my full cupboards.
  • I’m thankful for a home with multiple rooms, and a yard to play in.
  • I’m thankful for our health.
  • I’m thankful that I’m able to work from home.
  • I’m thankful for the technology that lets me see my family & friends’ faces and hear their voices.
  • I’m thankful for puzzles, perler beads and Neftlix.
  • I’m thankful that winter is on it’s way out.
  • I’m thankful for memes that make me giggle.
  • I’m thankful for our many parks that allow us to get outside while social distancing.

What are YOU doing?

“Well, I guess I’ll never paint again.” To this I say, why not? Sure, we face painters may move from painting on kids at parties to painting on practice heads, boards, and our own kids until this all passes. But the beautiful thing about painting is that you can do it anywhere! If the only reason you painted faces to begin with was to be paid at parties, it may not have been your calling after all. We don’t create our own circumstances, but our circumstances can reveal the person. Yes, even positive people are entitled to their own occasional pity party. But don’t let that be the new definition of you! Get your cry out and get back to creating!

You have control over whether you keep doing art or not. You now also have control over what you create, when and how you create it…no clients to satisfy, just yourself! Take advantage of that! I’ve seen artists sharing their huge, new design boards they’ve created this past week. I’ve seen artists painting designs to reflect their current struggles, depicting our current world through their eyes. I’ve seen artists sharing their gifts with others. Sewing masks. Decorating sidewalks. Making cards for the elderly.

What I’m Doing…

I can’t control the timing of when my income will return. But I can choose to make the most of this thing I ALWAYS seem to wish I had more of but money can’t buy: time!

The irony is not lost on me. So often I wish I had more TIME…the thing money can’t buy…because I’m so busy spending what time I do have trying to earn the money that can’t buy it, and spend what little extra time I have well. Now that we have no source of income, we find ourselves almost drowning in this elusive, priceless gift of time. Will we spend it well or waste it, only to long for it again when our work picks up?

For now I’m just taking it one day at a time. Having kids really helps because you HAVE to be positive for them. They are watching. All. The. Time. And learning from their parents how to react to tough situations. Right now we are on spring break, so I’m trying to let it be just that…a regular spring break with no strict schedules. They’ll get back to that soon enough when our district’s e-learning plans start. For now, they spend the week with mom, having fun and being creative, just less going out to movies & playgrounds…

Over the weekend I took advantage of the chance to give a little art lesson to my boys! Art imitates life, so I decided to do a still-life project with the subject being a roll of toilet paper!

Still life art lessons with Mom!

We are each creating 9 little pieces, using 9 different mediums, on little squares of paper that are exactly the same size as a sheet of TP! The boys learned about drawing cylinders, how ellipses change with perspective, how to shade, and use some fun tools they’ve never used!

We now have a puzzle table set up, which we’ve really never done. My boys are helping me cook more…

…we’ve gotten out our huge stash of perler beads and are creating a growing honeycomb art piece. My boys have even been helping me sort and organize my gem stash!!

As for my work, I’ve been able to start some projects that have been waiting on the back burner, like creating new stencils for my shop that are designed to be used with my new tutu bling, and painted tutus with 3D fairy wings! (Follow our Facebook page to find out when these stencils are available in the shop!) I’m remaining hopeful that the MN State Fair will happen, and preparing for the Glitter Glamper‘s 2nd year! And if it doesn’t happen, I’ll be super prepared for 2021!!

I’m also already working on the next issue of Wet Paint Magazine. Not because it will make me any money, because it has yet to make any profit for me…it’s purely something I create because I love to do it, and it’s mission is to uplift, inspire, and encourage my fellow artists…something we ALL need right now!

Will you let this change you for the better?

I was in a wonderful Zoom call with over 20 other artists around the country last week, put on by Lori Hurley. My favorite quote from the call was when Steve Klein said, “Tough times don’t last, but tough people do.”

The Big Question…

So, I ask you again…are you an egg or a potato? Will you choose to let your circumstances turn you into mush, or will you allow them to make you stronger than ever before? Whether you use your talents to uplift your family in quarantine, or your greater community, show the world what you’re made of! Your circumstances can’t take away your talent, or even your joy, if it comes from the right source! Stay strong painty friends! Hope and joy are just as contagious as fear! What are YOU choosing to spread?

What have YOU been doing to keep your sanity in quarantine? How are your kids keeping entertained? How are you using your art to spread hope and joy? Please share in the comments! We all could use some more ideas for the days and weeks to come!

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Use your DOWN time to UPlift: Flood your Friends’ Accounts with Positivity!

Hey entertainer friends! Let’s use our “down” time to “UPlift” our fellow small business owners! Chances are you’ve worked with many artists who have their own business. Let’s use this time we have to lift each other up by leaving positive reviews!! Not made up ones of course, but share your positive experiences working with or for your peers. Lets flood our social media and business listings with great reasons for people to hire each other, once this all blows over and people start planning events again!! I’m planning to go through this list of sites and find all my friends over the coming weeks and lift them up! Who’s with me? Please feel free to share this jpeg and include any links needed for some sites that require them for reviews! We got this!

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Coronavirus and Face Painting: Tips for Artists and Event Planners

Keeping the face painting process hygienic has always been an important concern for artists and parents alike, although it’s getting a lot more buzz lately on social media with the latest outbreak of Coronavirus.

Whether you are someone who is living in fear of contracting the virus, someone who thinks it’s all media hype, or are somewhere in between, is really irrelevant. The fact is that however real the risk is, and whether we personally react to it at all or not, it IS affecting our business as entertainers. I live in Minnesota and recently started hearing of artists having events cancelled due to Coronavirus, when we hadn’t even had a single confirmed case yet. A lot more of this is happening in other parts of the country, so it’s a topic worth discussing. I am no doctor or infectious disease expert, but here are my thoughts on this and any virus this time of year, as they pertain to our industry!

Advice for artists & entertainers

Several artists have asked me what my common sense opinion is on this current situation. I actually wrote about this topic 5 years ago, and it all still applies for artists today, and really every day. If you are a face painter, I highly recommend reading this post and evaluating your practices. Make any changes you feel are needed, and let your clients know what you are doing to prevent the spread of germs. Here are just a few simple ways you can help stop the spread of germs:

  • If you use sponges, use only one per child, whether they are disposable or you wash/sanitize them later, & don’t double-dip. (I avoid sponges almost entirely)
  • Don’t paint over lips with your brushes. There is no need; there are plenty of disposable lip application tools out there. (see my older blog post)
  • Keep your rinse water clean by changing it often. Use multiple basins to keep dirty water and fresh water separate.
  • Rinse your brushes well between kids. For an extra precaution, bring a little jar of 70% alcohol to swish them in between faces.
  • Use hand sanitizer between customers & wash hands well whenever possible.
  • Keep disinfectant wipes/sprays on hand to clean your equipment periodically.
  • Allow your paints to dry thoroughly between events.
  • Wash and sanitize all brushes, sponges, towels, etc between events.
  • Don’t paint over open wounds or on visibly sick kids.
  • For an extra precaution, wipe the area to be painted with 70% alcohol wipes before you begin. I already do this when attaching bling, so wiping a larger area is no big deal.
  • Do what you can to boost your own immune system with whatever healthy foods and supplements are available that you like!

Advice for event planners looking to hire entertainers

If you have hired a professional artist who takes hygiene seriously like I do, then I would venture to guess that kids are at greater risk interacting with each other waiting in line for painting, than they are sitting in my chair. Any time a large group of people gather in one place, the spread of germs is a given. However, here are a few things you might consider when lining up entertainment for your event:

  • Ask the artists you hire what their hygiene practices are. If anything is lacking or bothers you, ask them what they can do to alleviate your concerns.
  • Hire a real professional. Someone who’s livelihood depends on happy, healthy clients is way more likely to invest in sanitary practices and the expensive, FDA compliant products we use that contain antimicrobial properties.
  • Hire enough artists for your crowd size. Long lines means more bodies in close quarters. The quicker you can get kids through the line and back to the event, the less time they’ll be bunched up, potentially coughing on each other while they wait!
  • Provide hand sanitizer for your guests. If you are providing a volunteer line manager to help the kids form a line and choose designs, this is a great job for them!
  • If face painting still makes you or your guests really uneasy, try adding on something else that doesn’t involve touching the face, like balloon twisting or glitter tattoos. Or, request that your artist only paint on arms. Our bling bar is another great option that can be done with no brushes or sponges involved!
  • Know that we care. As artists we want all of your guests to have an awesome experience! And trust us, this is a subject we are concerned with all the time, not just during a widespread public outbreak. It is in our own best interest to keep things sanitary too! We drop ourselves right down into the center of crowds of kids on a regular basis. Kids cough and sneeze directly into our faces often, so we are always vigilant. We don’t like getting sick either, so you can rest assured we are doing everything we can to keep our stations healthy, for you AND ourselves! 😉

With any virus outbreak, you have to use your own judgement depending on your location and your own event’s setup. But, if you are an artist, I hope that this post has given you some ideas to step your sanitary practices up a notch. If you’re an event planner, I hope that this helps to ease your mind to know how hard we work any day of the year, not just cold & flu season, to keep your guests healthy and safe!

More Resources & Information

World Health Organization: The WHO has issued an event planning guide. Check it out here. It is meant to be read in conjunction with their Key Considerations for Public Health for Mass Gatherings.

The Center for Disease Control: The CDC has also issued a statement about mass gatherings as they relate to coronavirus.

They also have posted the best household cleaning recommendations for killing the virus here, and have a list of EPA approved products here.

Interactive Map: For an interactive map of the spread of coronavirus, check out this map by Johns Hopkins.

Got some of your own tips and tricks that I didn’t cover here or in my more extensive post on hygiene? Please feel free to comment and share!

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How much paint do I need?

One of my most frequently asked questions that I get from my customers is, “how many faces can I paint with this set?” or, “I’m painting [x number of] kids; how much paint do I need?”

Many other online retailers will give you a number of how many faces their palette will do.  I totally understand, as I know it helps you to estimate how much you need, and they would probably get this same question over and over if they did not assign some sort of number. However, realistically it is impossible to give a real solid estimate for many reasons.  There are many factors that affect how long your paint will stretch:

Size of the designs. 

Are you doing small “cheek art,” partial faces, or full face designs?  Smaller cheek art will make your paint last MUCH longer than full faces, for obvious reasons.  Covering an entire face with white will take up probably the same amount of paint that doing 15-20 unicorns or rainbow clouds on smaller cheek designs.  Even the size of your cheek art itself can make a huge difference.  Do you paint small, or do you make your designs as large as you can to fill the cheek?  Over hundreds of faces, that can make a big difference.  Here are some examples of the differences among these levels of designs:

Cheek Art
Partial Face
Full Face

Range of colors in your designs. 

Are you displaying a board of designs that use all colors of the rainbow?  Or are you doing a Christmas event where you’ll be using a lot more green and red than other colors?  If you’re using all colors relatively evenly, a rainbow palette should work great as a starting point for many events.  If you’re planning to use a lot more of certain colors, larger, individual cakes will ensure you don’t run out, or a few extra palette refills of the colors you’re using most.  And keep in mind, even if your design menu reflects a wide range of colors, you still can’t guarantee you’ll use them evenly.  I can’t tell you how many times I do one unicorn, and then every girl after that wants the same thing, making me use a lot more white than other colors.

How much water you use.  

Being that the paints are water based, you’ll be using water on your brushes and sponges to apply it.  The amount of water you use when you paint, coupled with the above factors, can mean the difference of your paints lasting through one gig or through a year’s worth of gigs.  More water will stretch your paints farther, but give you less vivid and opaque colors.  Less water can make your paints bright and bold, but run out quicker.  Every artist will have their own unique ratio that they like to work with.

What type of paint you use. 

With some brands, metallic and UV paints can require more water and more paint to get them to a good covering consistency than the regular standard colors, because they are made up of different ingredients. If you use these more sparingly as accents like I do, they will last you years.  But if you are trying to paint a tin man and make his entire face look like silver, you could easily use up most of a large cake, whereas the same size cake of a standard blue (maybe you’re dressing up as Blue Man Group for Halloween?), could cover several people’s faces, arms and hands.

How many artists are painting.  

It would logistically be very hard for more than two artists to share a palette.  You could theoretically have one artist on either side of a table with one palette, and then you’ll have your “subject” in front of each artist.  Having had to share paints in the past myself before, I’d prefer to have my own palette to work from.  But, at the bare minimum, if you’re doing a charity event with low budget and can’t spring for a palette for each artist, I’d suggest at least 1 palette per 2 artists.  Some artists may use more paint than others as well due to the other factors I mentioned, so increasing the amount of paint you have on hand will help ensure you have enough.  Every artist needs their own set of brushes as well…you do not want one artist sitting there painting nobody because he or she is waiting for the outline brush from another artist…otherwise there is no point in having more than one painter.

“So how do I estimate then?!”

So, you may be saying, now what?  How am I supposed to estimate what I need?!  Many other face paint supply websites will claim some number of faces you can paint with their sets, but the reality is now obvious, that it really depends on too many things to give an accurate number.  Just know that these numbers are only estimates, based on one person who is making an assumption about how and what you will be painting.

Here are my recommendations to help you decide whether you need a palette set, or the larger individual colors…

Get Refillable Palettes if:

• You are doing a one-time gig, helping out at your local school or church event. (I also put together a Smile Painter Set package for people in your situation, which includes instruction, a design sample sheet, and brushes)

• You already have a full professional kit but would like to play around with a bunch of new colors and affects before investing in the larger cakes.

• You just want to have a set of quality paints around to do your kids’ faces every year for Halloween or for their birthdays. Any of the palettes are a great option for you. I’d recommend starting with a set of the bright, standard colors in a 6 to 12 color set.  If you want to add more excitement to your selection, you can always try out the metallics or fluorescent makeup later.  You can even build your own set and mix and match, depending on the brand.  You can always purchase more refill cakes to replace any that run out down the road!

Get the large, individual cakes if:

• You are planning to paint at a very large event with hundreds of kids

• You are only going to be using a few colors on everyone (example: painting only with the school colors at a football game)

• You are a professional who goes through a lot of paint. (also check out our Business Starter Kit!”)

• You don’t need the palette packaging itself and you refill your own paint containers.

Get a mix of BOTH palettes and large cakes if:

• You are a professional who wants a small, portable set (palette boxes) but use enough that you’ll be refilling them a lot.  (You can buy the larger cakes of each color to keep at home, and refill your little palette box as needed out of that “stash,” saving money per ounce over the palette refills.)

• You are doing a small gig but plan on using more of certain colors, such as more red and green at a holiday event or school colors at a football game. (Get a multi-color palette, plus add larger cakes of the colors you expect to use a lot more of)

Add these other items if desired:

• Brushes: I’d recommend a set for each artist at minimum: a #5 and #2 round to cover both larger areas and outlining, for smaller designs and basic cheek art. Add in a 3/4″ flat brush if you are planning on using any one strokes, and a larger round brush for full faces.

• Sponges: If you plan to do full-face designs or do quick rainbows with a rainbow palette, a sponge will cover very large areas very quickly.

• Glitter: If you want to add some sparkle, the “multi” and “blue violet” work great on every color of paint, but there are many colors if you want to have a lot of fun with it!

• Books and Design MenusIf you’ve just started getting into face painting and need a little more instruction on how to paint and face painting specifically

Practice Head or board: A practice head or practice boards is great for practice, whether you’re just starting out or are a professional looking to perfect your designs on your own schedule without relying on a willing “subject!”

If you’re still left wondering after reading this post, feel free to comment here with your questions or shoot me an email…I love to help!

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Learning to Face Paint: Where Do I Start?


Need a little help getting started face painting? Been asked to face paint at your church or school event and you just don’t know where to begin? This blog post is for you. I’ve been face painting professionally for over 19 years and love helping others learn how too. 

What Supplies Do I Need to Get?

It is easy to get overwhelmed with all of the products available on the market today.  The most important thing is to make sure you get quality paints that are specifically designed for skin.  For a really easy way to get started, check out our “Smile Painter Set” package deal, which includes quality makeup, brushes, a design sheet and a book full of tips and tricks! But if you’re interested in picking out all of the supplies yourself individually, read on for some suggestions and advice!

Paint:

A few things to consider when shopping for paint:

  • Safety should be your TOP deciding factor, not price. Stay away from cheap craft store paints made in China.
  • Never, EVER use craft paints or acrylic paints on skin! Here’s why. “Non-Toxic” does NOT mean safe for use on skin!
  • Use only professional makeup that is FDA approved for use on skin. (Kryolan, Wolfe, TAG, Paradise, Snazaroo, Cameleon, Mehron, etc…)

Check out this blog post for more information on how much paint is needed, and how long it will last.  For someone starting out or just doing a small event here and there, I would recommend a multi-color palette. These sets enable you to try a variety of colors without spending a fortune. When you run out of a color, simply purchase a refill and keep using your set for years to come! Or, if you plan on using a lot of certain colors, you can purchase larger cakes of colors individually that will last a LONG time!

Brushes:

A few things to consider when shopping for brushes:

Designs:

You will need some designs for the children to choose from that you are comfortable painting. I prefer to use a board or sign that is on display so that everyone in line can see it and have their design chosen when it’s their turn. Start by displaying only designs that you are comfortable painting. I have several heavily laminated design sheets available that work great…they are small enough to put in your tote bag of supplies, and sturdy enough to wash off at the end of your event!

 Never painted before? Then I’d recommend getting my companion book of full-color photos showing you how to paint every design on my Classic design sheets in 6 steps or less!

If you’d like to design your own menu and don’t want to tie yourself down to an exact image on a visual menu yet, we have a service just for you.  Choose the type of designs you’d like and we will create a custom word menu for you to print out!

Other Supplies:

  • Glitter: Not a requirement, but glitter sure does add a lot to a design! ONLY use glitter that is approved for cosmetic use by the FDA. Metallic craft glitters can scratch the cornea and are extremely dangerous!
  • Rhinestones & Adhesive: Definitely optional, but if you are doing a fancy princess party, they are a HIT!
  • Split Cakes: If you’re familiar with one-stroke painting, rainbow cakes can really add that WOW factor in little time! If you’re not familiar with this technique and want to learn, check out our book, “One Stroke Face Painting!”
  • Mirror: To show the kids the finished product. Bring an extra in case it breaks! Or better yet, get an unbreakable mirror.
  • Wet wipes: In case of mistakes and to clean your hands. Makeup remover wipes work especially well!
  • Water jar: To rinse your brushes and wet the paint.  We sell a variety of great brush tubs with ridges in the bottom, which really help get your brushes clean!  But to be honest, you can get by just fine with any old jar or cup of water!
  • Towels, Chairs, Hair Clips, etc…

How Do I Learn How to Face Paint?

We have many resources available at Paintertainment:

Feel free to email me any time as well! I love to help fellow artists!

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Going Glamping at the Minnesota State Fair!

The Minnesota State Fair one of the largest state fairs in the country, a very close second only to Texas in attendance size. This year was no exception, with an all time attendance record set at 2,126,551. Half of the 12 days of the 2019 state fair set new daily attendance records. It has long been known as an impenetrable fair for local face painters who have tried for decades to get a booth space. After years of my fellow artists urging me to get into the fair so they could work in my booth, I had tried applying several years ago to no avail. The fair simply had no interested in adding any more face painters besides the one booth already located near the kiddie rides. However, one night last summer as I was drifting off to sleep on a family camping trip the idea came to me to combine several things I love into a new concept: Camping, bling, and retro 1950’s style. The “Glitter Glamper!” The Glitter Glamper would bring all forms of body glitter, focusing on bling rather than face painting, and be marketed at a wider age range to include teenagers and adults. I resisted the urge to wake my husband up and tell him my exciting idea and saved it ‘till morning, and instead proceeded to scroll through vintage camper listings on Facebook marketplace into the wee hours of the night.


Conveying the Concept

My extended family ends every summer with a big camping trip on Labor Day weekend, so I decided to take advantage of this captive audience of my kids and their cousins to capture photos of some of my ideas over Labor Day 2018. My nieces modeled my first ever unicorn horn, monster horns and mermaid designs, and a week or so later my husband let me glitter his beard for a photo shoot! 

I bought the url GlitterGlamper.com and created a quick website and Facebook pages so I’d have at least some online presence. I designed and printed one business card to put with my application. I worked hard to put together a colorful, glittery proposal as soon as my boys went back to school, complete with a photoshopped rendering of my booth design concept, and sent it off to the fair. Finally my brain was able to relax…my idea was out there, on paper, and now OUT of my hands. If it was meant to be, it would return to me in the form of a state fair licensing agreement. And if not, well, at least I had given it my best shot! 

My glittery application

Knowing that it can take many years before hearing back from the fair, I had no expectations of hearing back any time soon.  While my Photoshopped rendering included a retro camper, lighting, awnings, and a vintage barber chair, I was not ready to take on the expense of building and storing these things with no idea if or when I would ever be able to use them at the fair.

And then the phone rang…

Summer turned to fall, fall to winter, and then one day in the middle of May 2019 I received a call.  The folks at the MN state fair had been following up with their regular vendors, and finding that there were a few who were not returning.  A few spots had suddenly opened up in their new “West End Marketplace,” and they thought my concept would be “perfect for that hipster crowd” that frequents the West End. Would I like a spot? Um…YEAH! Where do I sign and please take my money! 

My space at the fair…the West End Marketplace “cages!” These are a really cool hybrid between an indoor and outdoor space. The fair provides this nice structure with lighting and electricity, and each vendor can close and lock up their own booth at night.


The woman on the phone was super nice and really loved my vintage camper look and feel, although the space wouldn’t be able to accommodate an actual camper. (This is still my goal and I do plan to have an actual “Glamper” soon!) I assured her that with my background in retail display design, I would achieve the retro camping feel in whatever space they give me. She said “oh I just love your antique barber chair, that will look great in your booth! And your flower planters can go here and there…” In my head I’m thinking “oh, you mean the non-existant chair and planters that I digitally rendered? I guess it’s time to start shopping for a vintage barber chair!”  If you subscribe to my free online e-newsletters, you’ve read about my tendency to bite off more than I can chew, and then proceed to teach myself to chew faster, haha! This was certainly another one of those cases! Heck, the glitter beard she saw and loved in my application was literally the only one I had done…ever!

Photoshop rendering that I included with my application


Ready … Set … GO!

Naturally, my head began flooding with amazing ideas, crippling fears, immense excitement and an endless list of what-if’s. How on earth would I pull this off? My boys were going to be done with school and home with me 24/7 in just a couple weeks. June and July were already jam packed with leading VBS crafts, family camping trips and a 16 day road trip, and the first day to start setting up at the state fair overlapped with my busy county fair week in early August. This was about to be a huge. HUGE. Undertaking.  What am I going to DO? Well, there’s nothing to do except GET STARTED! I immediately dove into sketching ideas and scouring Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace for the things I needed. I drove to the fair to take measurements of my 10’ x 20’ “cage” for design purposes. I set to work designing banners, sewing custom awnings, creating original graphics and signage, defining all of my offerings and their prices (many of which I had never “technically” actually done before), and finding just the right furniture and decor for the booth. 

My boys helping me haul foam floor tiles down 3 stories in an apartment building we drove 45 minutes to get to!
Vintage steel cabinets I rescued from a curbside for free, cleaned up and painted! 
Lit sign! I designed a banner first, then made a wood base for it that hinged in the middle for easier transport. I mounted all the letters, then delivered it to my brother who got them all wired up for me!

My dad helping to repair an antique secretary desk I had purchased at a local shop. Here it is partially painted. This would function as a decoration and storage when not in use, then fold down when we had enough artists, to function as an artist station. 
Sam helping me sort gems by color

Some of the fixtures I covered in shelf paper. This is the checkout counter and register cashwrap. They sat in my living room for a couple months!

Navigating the fabric warehouse in search of the perfect fabric to make my awnings
Figuring out how to recruit, organize and compensate other artists was new and stressful territory for me. (The county fair booth I had done for over 20 years has really only been run by myself, with my mom taking one partial day.) But the one thing I knew for sure was that there was no way I could run a booth 12 hours a day for 12 days completely on my own. I sent out a call for interested artists, thinking maybe I’d get a handful if I were lucky. After all, I was as transparent as possible in my communications, letting them know that this first year I have no idea how much they’d make, if it would be worth their while or their cost of entrance tickets and parking, if weather would be gorgeous or unbearable, etc. To my wonderful surprise, I ended up with 13 of my fantastic, highly qualified painty friends who were eager to take on the uncertainty and join me in this adventure! Oh how very blessed I am to live in this area with such an incredibly talented and giving community of artists!

Then there was the bling itself…how on earth would I know how much to make? Having never done this before, I simply made as much bling as humanly possible over the next couple months. I hauled all of my supplies on our road trip in giant Rubbermaid bins, creating bling clusters and unicorn horns at campground picnic tables across the US and Canada. 

Making horns at a campground picnic table



I had some fun with it, posting my ever changing “bling count” on social media. I spent countless hours on the road on my laptop, working through artists’ paperwork, contracts, and figuring out the giant puzzle of a schedule with 13 different preferences and no clue how many people I would need on any given day or hour.

The seemingly rare moments I was actually home were spent building and painting a giant Paul Bunyan and Babe photo board, wire brushing and re-painting vintage steel cabinets I had picked up on a curbside, turning our old bbq grill into a glowing, gem-filled decorative prop, coating our rusty old lanterns with glitter and lighting them up with colorful lights, visiting the used retail fixture store in search of the perfect horn display, and running around town picking up Craigslist finds and scouring garage sales and thrift stores. Honestly, God’s fingerprints were ALL over this entire process as everything seemed to just fall right into place! (I could write a whole blog just on that!) A lot of things just CAME to me…by “things” I mean stuff I bought, and by “came to me I mean” I mean they were delivered by the Amazon fairy. I probably could have built a three story playhouse out of the Amazon boxes I acquired! But really, just the right items turned up just when I needed them at sales and thrift stores!

Paul and Babe in process! Yes I drove to the hardware store and loaded up a sheet of plywood, brought it home, drew it out and cut it out myself! My dad built me a base for it so people would have a step stool and it wouldn’t blow over!

Me and Wayde trying out the photo board! Notice the cobalt blue glitter beard on Paul…it quickly went from blue to purple to pink during the fair from the sun!

I was on a mission and my background in retail display design had given me enough experience to know that I did NOT have much time. This fact did force me to eat, sleep and breathe Glitter Glamper all summer, but it also thankfully kept me distracted from the reality that this was a HUGE undertaking: I simply could not afford to waste any time on worrying. Every time the enormity of the situation started to sink in, I dove into the next task, crossed one thing off my to-do list and then added three more.

Some of the many things I collected, made, found, refurbished, etc over the course of the weeks before the fair

The summer months slipped away in a flash among fair prep and family trips, and before I knew it August was here. My county fair which I had always previously considered my craziest week of the fair, seemed this year to be more like the calm before the storm. Five 12-hour days at the fair to simply paint, something I’d barely found time to do all summer, left me both energized and exhausted at the same time. I was ready to start setting up at the state fair, but had to push through the county fair as it’s entire profits would go towards chipping away at my state fair booth expenses!

No Time To Rest

On the last day of the county fair my husband, boys and I tore down my booth, unloaded the truck, and re-loaded the truck for the state fair. The next morning my boys and I took the first trip to the state fair. We laid down foam tiles (to save our feet on the concrete), a layer of astroturf (grass for our “glampsite!”), and hung banners. The next day a dear friend with a trailer helped us haul all the big, heavy stuff, including the elusive antique zillion-pound barber chair I had searched and stressed over and finally found just in time. Each day I drove to and from the fair to build and arrange my booth, as the radio personalities announced how many days left until the opening of the Great Minnesota Get-Together, sending shivers of terror and anticipation through my spine. It was going to happen, and I was going to be there, whether I was fully prepared for it or not!

Finally…the PERFECT barber chair!!

Needless to say, I didn’t get a ton of sleep in the month of August. I didn’t take the best of care of myself, and while I didn’t have time to worry, my body decided to stress on it’s own. I lost 5 pounds but thankfully stayed healthy throughout the month. (don’t be jealous, I immediately gained it back when the fair ended and all I wanted to do was eat and sleep, hahaha!) I shudder to think of what a simple cold virus could have done to me that month!

And Then There Were Artists!

Three days before the fair started I held an on-site meeting for my 13 wonderful artist friends who had graciously agreed to give up part of their busy, profitable summer month to take a chance with me on the fair. It was an emotional day, as it all became more real…I handed out sparkly hats with the Glitter Glamper logo and name tags, went over processes and the booth and answered lots of questions. All of my sweet painty friends were absolutely amazing! Not only did they all hike out to the fair for a meeting, but they even surprised me with sweet gifts, a cake, and sang to me! All I could think was that I didn’t want to let these amazing people down! 

My “Glampettes!” There’s NO way I could have done this without them!!

Naturally, with 13 artists and a handful of family members come dozens and dozens of ideas for ways to change or improve things. Everyone was very excited to see how the booth was coming along and had great ideas, and I was able to implement many of them in the couple days I had left before the fair started, though had to table some for next year as I just simply had run out of time! 

A few pics from our meeting day! My son Sam also filmed me opening up the booth so I could make an instructional video for the artists.


I would later learn that my husband had told my family wanting to help, to not suggest anything new or any changes to me…simply do what I ask…because I tend to take every suggestion as an item on my to-do list. This is true, and my desire to make my booth the most comfortable, fun and functional space possible for all of my artists, I left the meeting totally overwhelmed with new suggestions that I wanted to implement but simply couldn’t physically address them all. I had to force myself to prioritize and let a lot of things go. On top of that, my cash register drawer was not working, internet was not working, and I only had a couple more days to figure it all out. Aaah! Oh, and did I mention my vehicle which had never had issues in the decade I’ve driven it, suddenly decided to NOT start on random occasions for no clear reason? Yup, I ended up stranded at the fair during setup a couple times, and we still to this day have no idea what is wrong or when it will act up again and leave me stranded. Thankfully my best friend (who’s husband also hauled all my stuff with his trailer) loaned me her van for the entire fair and then some, and took my boys for multiple day-long play dates so I could get work done. 

The one thing I really, really wanted to do but just ran out of time for was hosting jams for all of the artists to practice what we were offering and develop some amount of consistency. Once again my wonderful friends stepped up, without me even asking, and hosted their own jams! Jodi hosted a jam, fed everyone pizza, printed out my “Glamping Guide” for everyone and even roped in a real beard to practice glittering on. Tricia hosted an ALL DAY open house style jam at her house, turning over her entire living room to glitter and made countless videos of her experimentations with various glitter products, tools and methods to share. Tiffany hosted a jam immediately following our on-site meeting to squeeze in some more practice before go time! They really picked up my slack and I’m eternally grateful! Jamming is one thing I will definitely make a lot more time for in 2020! In the huge list of things I had to “let go,” jamming was on the TOP of the list as far as importance to the whole operation, and will be the first item to move up to my DO list next year.

I really tried to capture pictures of every “shift” throughout the fair. Here are a few of our “Shift Pics!”


It Takes a Village!

I am really terrible at asking for or accepting help, and this state fair adventure really forced me to rely on friends and family! My engineer brother figured out how to wire up my lit sign so that I could plug it in instead of turning on individual battery powered letters. My husband let me basically take over the entire garage for the summer and overload the house with glitter and furniture. (As of this post it’s still too full to park in as we try to figure out where & how to store everything!) He even dropped me off and picked me up for the first few days of the fair and some of the last, and worked as my booth “babe” for two full days, sporting a colorful glitter “wannabeard!” (If you don’t have an actual beard to be glittered, we can give you a “wannabeard!”) My in-laws took our boys for the first 5 days so we could focus on the fair. My dad hung my beast of a sign above the booth and fixed countless little issues in the booth, and my mom made sure my artists and I had an assortment of yummy snacks and fruit for the fair, and worked the register one day as well! My boys were such good sports about finding glitter on all of their stuff, and happily helped me sort gems, trim laminated pieces, count glitter tattoo stencils and run a zillion errands. My niece worked as my booth babe for the first few days, which was her first job ever at 13! The amazing Lori Hurley made sure that I took a break to eat, and one day even brought in fresh salad ingredients so I would get something healthy! I definitely couldn’t have pulled it off without everyone’s help! But I have to say it was really cool to finally let my family catch a glimpse of my painty friends and how AWESOME they all are.

My husband Wayde and one of the several “Wannabeards” he wore while working in the Glamper!
Learning As We Go

My artists are really a class act and were so absolutely vital to the success of the first year! They were so open and crazy flexible, knowing that I had no clue how many of them I’d need on any given day, yet willing to set aside their time for me, just in case. I went in thinking the night crowd would be bigger with concerts nearby, but it turned out to be opposite: we were busiest before lunch. I had people “on call” in case we got busier than expected, and people on the schedule as “maybe’s” unless we were slow or it was rainy. They were true friends, sticking it out as we all learned as we went…(hopefully) not taking it personal if I had to cut them. I had to cut shifts, move people around, and rearrange things almost daily. By the end of the fair of course we had learned a lot, and next year I feel like I can arrange the schedule better to maximize everyone’s earning potential.

A few photos of the booth in action



Learning to Let Go

The first thing I did after receiving the call in May from the fair was contact everyone I knew who had worked at the fair, or other fairs, for advice. I got a lot of great advice, including the suggestion to take a couple days off to get my kids ready for school. Thanks to my spectacular team, I was able to take two days off in a row in the middle of the fair to get my boys to their respective school open houses, and pack for our big family Labor Day camping trip that now overlapped the fair. (yeah, I know…crazy…) This involved some of my artists arriving early to set up, staying late to tear down, and running my important paperwork on daily income totals to the fair office for me before the deadline every day. They were simply amazing. I knew the booth was in excellent hands, but handing over your baby to anyone is hard! 

On day 5 of the fair I was there sitting in my fancy barber chair, my feet throbbing and so happy to be there but so unbelievably exhausted. I told my mom who was being my “booth babe” that day, “I feel like I’ve just given birth, and it’s all I can do to just lie here and watch other people interact with it!” I wished I had more energy to take it all in, but just getting to this point had wiped me out! My fellow artists certainly carried me! And for those two days off, though MUCH needed and refreshing, I felt like I had just handed my 5 day old baby off to a babysitter already!

Wait..WHAT?!

My first “day off” at home I had just missed a call from one of these awesome artists, Tricia. It was hard to hear her voicemail over the noise (we are located right by an amphitheater), but what I made out was, “Call us as SOON as you get this! We are DYING over here!” Oh. My. Goodness. Which of my worst fears had happened? Did the Square terminal crap out on me? Is the register drawer stuck? Did Paul Bunyan blow over and crush a small child? Were there so many people they couldn’t handle the crowd? Had we run out of unicorn horns? Oh my goodness, why did I ever think I could miss a day at the booth?! 

With my heart pumping I called Tricia back immediately and to my complete surprise was informed that members of the fair board had just stopped by to present us with an award, for “Best of the Fair” of 2019! WHAT?! 



Turns out they were “dying” of excitement, haha! I was to appear a couple days later at one of their stages to accept the award with any other members of my staff. Tricia, Stella, Naomi and Jelly were all there that day, as were my husband and two boys, since it was the morning I had taken off to actually visit the fair with them. We were the only brand new booth to receive the award, which is given to only 12 out of 1,200 vendors. What an honor!



Live TV? No Pressure!

Even with my thrifty ways, I spent a LOT of money on the booth. I knew that this was the one and only year that I would be the NEW thing at the fair that the media would be interested in covering, so it had to be amazing no matter what. Money was no object. Well, okay, I limited myself to my credit card limit!

Boy am I glad I went all out, because the media requests came flooding in before the fair started! I had lined up several news station appearances during the 12 days of the fair, with the first being just two hours into the first day! Two local news personalities from KARE 11 came to our booth the first day for a short interview, and got glitter tattoos. 

Being filmed for KARE 11
It was a really fun time and their camera man stuck around for quite a while afterwards capturing more footage. Later we’d learn that they wanted me to come to their studio at the fair, where they’d play the recorded footage and have me do a live demo on camera. 
Me with my boys and one lucky girl from the audience, live on KARE 11
This live demo also happened to be the same day my family was visiting the fair with me, so they not only sat through the award ceremony but also the live newscast, but they loved it. My boys were so excited to spend the entire day at the fair which they had never done, and both of them got to be on the news, modeling our monster horns and glitter tattoos. Our wonderful friends (with the trailer, the van, the play dates…) were also there that day in the audience. Tricia accompanied me to the station and unbeknownst to her, got roped into doing a glitter beard live on camera! She rolled with it being the amazing person she is, and somehow not only found me a girl with her hair pulled back and ready for a unicorn horn, but snagged herself a guy with a long, white beard from the audience in a ZZ Top t-shirt willing to let her glitter him up!

Tricia and her epic orange beard, done live for KARE 11! I’d later learn that Reggie, our beard model in this photo, loved it so much he didn’t shower for a couple days!
Besides our visit from KARE 11 and live demo on their stage, I also went live on KSTP channel 5’s newscast as well as their “Twin Cities Live” show, demonstrating mermaid tails, unicorns and the like. Tricia was so sweet to accompany me to a couple of these, leaving her chance to make money on the booth behind to help me haul stuff and keep my mind off of my nervousness. She even had her mom and kids one day, ready to go as models! Many of my other artists found themselves on camera from the booth coverage, and were surprised one day when a personality from FOX 9 just showed up and filmed them. I never did get to see that one since nobody saw it coming! 

The final live TV appearance of the fair I had to go it alone as we were short handed, but was relieved to have been given specific instructions this time for what they wanted. They were going to have me paint ears and affix a unicorn horn on one adult woman. Great, I thought…I’ll bring a few other pieces of bling just to show what we have, and will bring just what I need for one unicorn: a split cake or two, black, white, a couple brushes and glitter. Finally, I knew exactly what to expect and didn’t have to try to pack up everything to make anything, just in case. Well, it turned out when I arrived for this last appearance, and just before going on camera they decided instead that they wanted me to paint one of the news personalities’ kids because his family happened to be there. Okay, so there was a little girl instead of a grown woman…no biggie! “Oh, but he actually has three kids, and we don’t want the others to feel left out. So can you do all three instead? And by the way, one of them is a boy so just do something more boy-ish.” I proceeded to panic inside…I had this opportunity to also showcase our awesome monster faces, and I had a pair of horns but no scale stencils, no blues or greens, and no glitters to match. And I had another horn or a mermaid tail I could use on girl #2, but no fun mermaid pattern stencils, and no blues. I told them that I had so many cool boy things and other things I could demonstrate but just didn’t bring anything with for them, and their reply was, “well if you can just be flexible and do something boy-ish that would be great!” 

My inner perfectionist was freaking out, looking down at my pink and purple split cakes and unicorn horns, knowing I could do so much better with the right tools. However, in the end it all worked out. I had just enough time to quickly complete a unicorn, and partially complete the other so that I could finish it live on camera. For the little boy I was able to hand paint some colorful scales by picking a few of the more primary colors out of my TAG Pansy split cake with a round brush, and adding colorful festival glitter on top for a rainbow monster. In my mind it was not the ideal monster design, but this little boy totally pulled if off, roaring enthusiastically for the camera! And hearing the audience “ooh” and “aah” as I attached the final unicorn horn and spread on a layer of festival glitter was icing on the cake. The moral of the story: just wing it. It’ll work out. This ended up being a really great news spot and they even let everyone know that we do parties as well!

On Twin Cities Live

Me with the Twin Cities Live’s anchors and family after the segment was done!
I won’t lie, it was super stressful having to pack up my gear and leave the booth, hoping I remembered everything, not having planned on extra artists to fill my place…not to mention just hoping I didn’t pass out or throw up on camera, haha! The nerves tore me up and I was never able to eat until I finished with the TV stuff, but just like when I arrive at a gig, as soon as the paints come out, the nerves melt away. I survived…I wasn’t super eloquent and am definitely not made for TV, but every TV appearance brought a new rush of people who saw us on TV and had to come check us out!

Glamper Offerings

Here are a few photo collages of just a handful of the fairgoers we adorned with glitter this year!

I had a display book full of bling clusters that our guests could choose from! Bling clusters themselves ranged from basic to premium, all had glitter of course, and could come with or without a little painted embellishments.

Our festival faces included unicorns, mermaids and monsters! I’m excited to expand on these a little more in 2020!

Festival glitter was our most popular item at the fair!

Glitter freckles were popular and fun! Guests could choose to add star or heart patterns within their glitter freckles.

Glitter tattoos were a hit, and a great option for those rainy days because they are waterproof!

I have SO many photos…I may add more in the future! But in the meantime you can check out our Facebook and Instagram pages to see more!

So How Rich Are You?




Tell any Minnesotan that you’ve landed a booth in the state fair and the first thing they’ll say will be something in reference to Sweet Martha’s and how rich you are about to become! For non-Minnesotans, Sweet Martha’s is a wildly successful vendor that sells fresh baked chocolate chip cookies to the tune of about 1 million cookies per day. They are the fair’s top grossing food vendor, with over $4.73 million dollars in gross revenue last year among their three locations…almost $3.4 million more than the next highest grossing vendor on the list. So, naturally, everyone in the state fair leaves filthy rich, right? Well, not quite.

I had no grand expectations for profit this first year, and may have been the only one with realistic expectations. Maybe it’s because I’ve been running county fair booths for over two decades,  or maybe it’s because I was the only one watching my business credit card balance climb daily! But making money, while always something a business owner aims for, wasn’t really my main goal this year. My goal since trying to get into the fair was simply that…to get in…to prove to myself that I could conquer the impenetrable fair, land a space, design the heck out of it, create something that the fair had never seen before, become a new tradition for fairgoers, and finally provide a place in our own state fair for our own local, professional artists to showcase their rock star talent. Not only did I achieve all of these goals, but I did it in record time and got an incredibly exclusive award in the process! I’d say the first year was a raging success just by those standards!

Financially, I maybe broke even this year at best (still tallying up expenses)…though still have more expenses to come as I figure out how to store all my stuff until next year. However, in talking to the many friendly vendors around me, I learned that it typically takes 3 years to become profitable at the fair. The booth itself did very well, and I feel that if I can just restrain myself from making TOO many big, expensive improvements for next year, I may make some profit in 2020. 

The buzz was just incredible around the Twin Cities about our booth! Each day we seemed to draw more customers, even if the fair’s attendance had not necessarily increased from the day before. The word was getting out fast, and we soon were getting repeat customers already during the fair week. The media spots definitely drew in more people who wouldn’t have found us otherwise, and really helped to educate the community about what we actually offer. Countless fairgoers commented that next year they are coming right to our booth first thing, and many people said that this was just what the fair needed. The wonderful comments and encouragement from visitors to our booth were such great fuel to keep up our energy and excitement, and keep me looking forward to next year! Adult women were regularly commenting on how special they felt, how much fun it was to get blinged up, and how they were going to come back with their friends. We did over 50 glitter beards during the fair, and many of the men came back at the end of the day just to tell us how much fun they had all day with people stopping them for photos, and all the attention they received! The Glamper is out there, the word is spreading like glitter, and I am confident that our local following will grow more every year!

Want more?

This post got loooong, but if you want to know more, including my list of tips and advice for running a booth at your own state fair or similar event, you can find the full article in the Fall 2019 issue of Wet Paint Magazine

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“Where have you Been?!” My Recent Adventure

I think some of my followers have been wondering this lately…Where have I been?! In May I had signed up for the Inspiration to Paint group on Facebook, thinking I’d have a month to participate before my boys got out of school and the summer rush hit me full on! Then a couple weeks into the month I got a call from the Minnesota State Fair.

I had applied a couple years ago for face painting, but despite having literally millions of attendees each summer, they are dead set against having any more than the one single booth by the kid rides. So last fall I submitted a new proposal for a new concept that came to me one night while lying in my camper bed one weekend: The Glitter Glamper! The concept was a cool, retro, vintage camper, gutted and turned into a glitter body art studio on wheels. Unicorn horns, gem cluster, festival glitter and even glitter beards were on the menu, with just a touch of paint to go along with them. I bought the URL, opened various social media accounts, created a Photoshopped rendering of the concept, bound it together in a glittery, diamond studded presentation booklet explaining the idea and shipped it off to the fair board for consideration, expecting to hear back someday, if I was lucky!

My State Fair “Glamplication”

My original concept rendering
glitter beard

unicorn horn
bling cluster and decolletage

I believe that normally folks find out in the dead of winter whether they’ve been selected to be a licensee for the following summer. Much to my surprise, I got the call in May as the fair began calling around their regular vendors to confirm, and found out that a few were not coming back, and I was offered a 20′ x 10′ corner stall! They were genuinely excited about the concept, and felt it would be perfect for the type of crowd that visits their newly remodeled “West End Marketplace!”

Our location in the West End Marketplace

So, realizing that the fair was only 3 months away and at least half of that was already packed with summer family fun, camping trips, leading crafts at my church’s VBS and my other county fair, I literally dove right into design and production mode without looking back. I bowed out of the Inspiration to Paint group for the month (sorry guys!), ordered zillions and zillions of gems, and began my hunt, scouring the Twin Cities Facebook Marketplace and Craigslist adds for the pieces I needed for my booth.

Glamper Location for 2019! This front corner, and the stall next to it! (20’x10′)

While my original concept was for a physical “glamper,” the space I’ll be given for the fair won’t accommodate a camper. It’s basically like an outdoor stall space but is nicer because it’s a solid structure with lighting, electric, and doors that lock. The folks at the fair really liked my whole “glamper” branding, look & feel though, so my goal is to still achieve that without an actual camper. With my degree in Industrial Design and background as a retail display designer, this whole thing is definitely in my wheelhouse, so I’ve been loving the whole design process, albeit a fast & furious one!

I’ve been having a ton of fun but spending every last minute and dime prepping for the fair, so this is what has kept me SO busy lately! I can’t wait to unveil the new “Glamper” setup this August! In the meantime, here are a few photos of my progress so far!

What’s a fair booth without a photo op board?! Paul has a glitter beard and Babe has glittery horns!

Working on my overhead sign with light up letters…my electrically and mechanically inclined brother is working on wiring these up to a plug instead of 9 individual battery boxes and switches!

Bling making in progress…gummy bear bling!

My boys are great at sorting gems for me!

My youngest posing by the 12 foot banner that will hang in the back of the booth…the booth will essentially be like the campsite that the Glamper is in, rather than being inside a camper itself. Be prepared for grass, trees and wildlife! 😀

What’s a “glampsite” without some Vintage lanterns?!

Staying cool in style

Yes, I’ve been making bling so much that I even have been sculpting unicorn horns while actually camping myself!

My table on any given day this summer…

Sweet antique barber chair for the booth! It weighs a TON! Thanks to my husband and good friend for helping get this thing OUT of the truck and into the garage! 
You can’t go glamping without a bbq grill! This one has color changing lights inside, underneath clear gems!

Of course I’ll be providing some sparkly new branded aprons and hats for my fellow artists!
Lanterns are a must for camping. Glittered lanterns are a must for GLAMPING!

Antique secretary desk as I purchased it…a bit broken. My carpenter dad fixed the fold-down desk for me!

Hutch after a facelift, before re-attaching the desk part! This will make a great work station that can close up and be out of the way when we have less artists!

My boys have been such great sports this summer as Mom spends so many hours out in the garage painting and building things, and driving all around the Twin Cities to pick up Craigslist finds for the booth!!

My 11 and 9 year old helping haul foam floor mats down 3 floors of an apartment building in Prior Lake last month! This was a long drive added to a long day while also leading crafts at my church’s VBS, but my feet and my artists’ feet will thank us for having these puppies tucked under the astroturf! 12 hours on concrete is hard on the feet!

We drove to Maple Grove to pick up these trees! My boys had to ride with them tickling their ears, but they got lunch at Jimmy John’s out of the deal! Can’t have a “glampsite” without some trees!!

When I saw this posting for FREE vintage, steel, 1950’s cabinets on a curb just 5 minutes from my house, I had to swing by and check them out. My youngest Toby is totally my enabler, haha! He’ll say, “Oh Mom, you HAVE to go to that garage sale if it says ‘vintage/retro’ in it!” Well when I got back in the car after inspecting these cabinets he said “Oh mom, I can tell you really want these. We can help you load them…I can fold the seat down!”

free cabinets on the curb

 It took me 3 or 4 trips I think to get all of these home, since I had two kids in the Jeep! But these were definitely dropped on the curb near me by God himself because they were just minutes from home and light enough for me to load! And did I mention…FREE?!

These needed a lot of love but were still totally functional. The lazy susan in our kitchen squeaks horribly, and my boys thought this one was SO nice because it is quiet, haha! It required a lot of scrubbing and cleaning. I’m sure there was dirt, oil and rust on these dating way back before I was born. I spent several days with a wire brush, steel wool and spray paint and got them looking gorgeous…some of these will serve as work stations in the booth while others will serve as storage space in the “back room.”

Ooooh…you had me at RED and CHROME!

Let’s just say that my basement, garage, and part of the living room has been taken over by pieces of the Glamper!! HUGE HUGE thanks to my wonderfully supportive husband for allowing me to basically take over his garage this summer! Okay, if one more person asks me where I’m going to store all this stuff, I just might scream…but right now I don’t have time to think that far ahead. (which if you know me is crazy unlike me, I’m a MAJOR planner-ahead-er!) After the fair we will see if this stuff pays for itself, and if so, I’ll search out storage options! Until then, I’ll stay way outside of my comfort zone and build now, plan later! Haha!

This has been a massive undertaking so far in a short amount of time. I eat, sleep and breathe Glamper but have had such an outpouring of support from family and friends, it’s been very humbling! I had dozens of artists step up wanting to help run the booth. Friends and family offering to watch our boys, help set up and tear down, help find random things I need for the booth, and offer to help in any way. My husband has helped lift crazy things and let me invade the garage and house. My dad has helped me repair and modify my furniture finds. My brother is working on lighting up my sign as we speak. My boys have not only run all over town with me gathering stuff and running errands, but help with many aspects of the booth, down to sorting gems and letting me paint glitter beards on them. My mom convinced her sweet neighbors (one of whom has a huge beard) to let me bling them out for photos. I even have fellow artists offering to donate their time to help me make bling clusters. What an awesome tribe we have here in the Twin Cities!! I SO hope and pray that this whole adventure turns out to be a worthwhile effort for all involved…or if nothing else, is FUN in the process!! The one thing I know is that we will all sparkle and shine in the process! I can’t wait to see how it all turns out…hope to see you at the fair!

Want to keep up with the Glamper’s adventures this summer? Follow us on social media! We’re sure to be posting lots of fun photos throughout the fair! 😀

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So you want to BE an Agent…

I am working to copy some of our past e-newsletter articles over to the blog to make them even easier for people to find! This particular article can be found in the May 2017 issue. Not a subscriber? You can learn how to subscribe and download past issues by clicking HERE!

So You Want to BE An Agent…

For my third installment on the subject of agents, this time we’ll briefly discuss some pro’s and con’s of acting as an agent, as well as some of the things you may have to consider that you don’t as an individual artist. (if you haven’t read my previous articles, check out “Finding a good agent” and “Keeping a good agent“)

Working as an agent is certainly not for the faint of heart.  It’s one of those jobs that looks so much greener from the other side of the fence, but once you jump over, you may likely find your foot land in a hidden pile of dog poo! Haha! For this reason, it is important to do your research and carefully weigh the pros, cons, and responsibilities involved with being an agent. (And when I say an agent, I mean the “good” kind I defined earlier)  Here are some things to consider!


The Pro’s

Your capacity increases

Hiring out other artists does increase the number of gigs you are able to cover.  (Though keep in mind that this brings with it many other cons associated with juggling multiple artists)
You can make more money

In the end, you can end up with a larger dollar amount in your pocket at the end of the year.  Whether it is enough to be worth all the extra hours you’re not paid hourly for to manage multiple artists though, is highly arguable!
You can have more family time

I do enjoy the ability to send other artists to gigs when I have a family event to attend instead! However, this does come with the constant possibility of someone not showing up or something going wrong, potentially requiring me to still drop what I’m doing to fix it. 
The Con’s
Less Painty More Desky

You will spend a LOT more time on the less fun part of the job than you will painting as an agent.  This includes writing, sending, and chasing down artist contracts. (yes, you MUST have written contracts for your artists!)  Writing, sending and chasing down payments from vendors.  Fielding any and all emails and phone calls from clients, calming frantic clients, and smoothing over disasters.  Getting recaps from all artists, thanking the clients, paying the artists, paying the artists again when they lose a check or move without telling you, getting reviews and ratings from clients, and following up with clients the next year in hopes of getting the gig again.
Then there’s just the business side that isn’t directly related to events…advertising, marketing, maintaining websites and social media accounts, responding to requests for quotes, etc etc.  If you don’t get enjoyment out of the administrative side of your job, agenting is definitely NOT for you!
Meet Uncle Sam

As an agent you are required to provide a 1099-MISC form to every independent contractor whom you pay $600 or more during any given calendar year.  This can be quite an undertaking, especially if you haven’t already collected social security numbers when originally hiring artists.  Bookkeeping in general becomes much more complicated and time consuming when acting as an agent, and more important.
Handing Over Your Reputation

It is hard to express how difficult it is to hand over my baby to another artist. It is no reflection of their talent or capabilities of course, but more about the decades of blood, sweat and tears I have poured into making my business what it is today.  The thought of one person having the power to hurt my business’ reputation is sortof terrifying for a new agent! Heck, it’s terrifying for a seasoned agent!  This is where you need to ensure that you are able to manage the expectations of both clients and artists, and handle sticky situations with grace.
Other Considerations
Cash Flow

Suddenly cash flow becomes incredibly important when you are responsible for paying artists.  If you’ll remember from our first agent article, a good agent doesn’t make you wait until they get paid before you get paid.  Making your artists wait to be paid more than a couple weeks for work they’ve already done is really unacceptable.  As an agent it is imperative that you either require payment up front from your clients, or manage your money in such a way that you are always able to pay your artists promptly when they perform for you.  Ticking off your artists will only hurt you and your business in the end, so this is important!
Your Actual Income 

Many artists who have had bad experiences with agents claim that agents are just getting rich off of their work.  Let me tell you, this is oh SO not the case.
For the sake of easy math, let’s say as an agent you charge $100 per hour, and pay your artist $80 per hour for a 1 hour birthday party.  For that 1 hour party you are spending a conservative estimate of 2-4 hours on this gig, which makes you a whopping $5-$10 per hour.  The wide range is affected by things out of your control….how difficult a client is, how difficult an artist is, etc.  Some clients you have to go back and fourth several times to get it booked. Some artists you have to send and re send contracts to get them signed. Some paychecks you have to re-write as an artist moved and didn’t give you their new address. The list of variables goes on and on.  Then you have to subtract the money you spend to GET those gigs that you give to other artists…your website costs, advertising, gig site bidding fees, or whatever you use to bring in business.
You will be spending a lot more time on paperwork and people management than you will on painting as an agent, and with no set hourly rate like your artists receive. Though as long as you get enjoyment out of these aspects of business and can find a good balance, it can be worth your while!  My suggestion is to start small, yet do it right from the beginning.  Don’t cut corners on bookkeeping or contracts.  It’s much easier to get the process down early on when you have 1 or 2 artists you frequently hire, rather than dozens!  Starting small will enable you to see if being an agent is for you before it consumes your business.  In a future issue of Wet Paint Magazine, I plan on doing a more in depth article on being an agent. I’d love to hear your experiences on the topic! Feel free to email me at Gretchen@Paintertainment.com if you’d like to share any insights or stories! 

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KEEPING A Good Agent

I am working to copy some of our past e-newsletter articles over to the blog to make them even easier for people to find! This particular article can be found in the April 2017 issue. Not a subscriber? You can learn how to subscribe and download past issues by clicking HERE!

Keeping a Good Agent

Last time we discussed how to FIND a good agent.  If you didn’t read that article, take a look back and learn what to look for in a good agent…while a bad agent can bring you tons of stress, a good one is worth their weight in gold!  Now that you’ve hopefully found a good agent, here are some tips to keep your relationship great.


Communication


Preferred Method of Contact

An agent can’t book you if they can’t get ahold of you.  The best way to ensure that you don’t miss out on a gig is to find out your agent’s preferred method of communication, and respond in that way, or at least in the way they contacted you.  If they email, send an email back.  If they call, call them back.  I personally am terrible at keeping up with phone calls, but am quicker with texts and emails!  
Check In
Check in with your agent as soon as possible after you finish a gig.  It’s NOT because they don’t trust you or want to babysit you. It’s really important for the agent to know what happened from your perspective asap, so that they can properly address any issues when they discuss how the event went with the client.  This enables them to have YOUR back if a client calls with a complaint.  For example, if the client claims you were too slow, it helps to have photographic evidence that twice as many kids came as they originally told you.  A good agent stands up for his or her contractors while smoothing over any issues, and in order to do this, you need to keep in close communication to work as a team.  
Likewise, agents would like to know if the client was especially pleasant, helpful, tipped you well, or did anything else that went above and beyond so they can properly thank them, and hopefully book YOU for the same event next year if you enjoyed it!
Sending photos with your check in is a huge plus, and for many agents, a requirement! It helps your agent to better understand the environment you were working in, and plan their discussions with the client for next year’s event, should any changes need to be made to make things run more smoothly.  I also request that artists who work for me send photos of several of their paintings, so I can thank the client with a photo collage of the beautiful work that was done!

Stay Top of Mind
I know this may make we agents sound spacey, but sometimes agents don’t hire you just because they don’t think of you or haven’t seen you in a while! It has nothing to do with your talent…they just deal with so many artists and so many events, that they tend to call those artists who are top of mind first. You can stay towards the top of your agent’s mind by sending an occasional email letting them know what you’ve been up to. Maybe you’ve learned a new skill, gotten better or faster at a particular design, added some cool new products to your kit, send a picture of something you’ve painted recently or let them know some upcoming weekends you have open. Don’t bombard them with spam, of course, but keeping communication consistent or just showing up at local jams, conventions, workshops or other events where the agent is can help keep you top of mind!
Be Professional
Punctuality is a Virtue!
Perhaps one of the worst things you can do to damage your relationship with your agent is to arrive late.   Whether you’re stuck in traffic, got bad directions, were given the wrong address, or had the time wrong on your calendar, we have ALL been there, myself included! While it can be totally mortifying for both the artist and the agent, no matter who’s fault it is, it immediately damages the reputation of the agent’s company.  Do whatever it takes to arrive on time, and plan to be early! 
When you are stuck in one of those situations where you’re running late, it is of utmost importance that you contact the agent the moment that you know you will be late. (not after the fact)  This gives them the opportunity to call up the client and prepare them, making life easier for you and preventing a possible client meltdown when you arrive. Agents take care of this uncomfortable stuff so you don’t have to…help them get the info they need so you can just have fun painting!
Take your Commitment Seriously
Backing out of a gig after you’ve signed a contract is right up there with arriving late, especially if it’s at the eleventh hour.  While you may be taking a to-do off your calendar, the agent is now taking on a huge list of stressful to-do’s to replace you.  Again, I’ve both done this myself, and had this done to me.  We’ve all been there and know it’s sometimes truely unavoidable. But no matter how good your reasons are, be as gracious, understanding, and accommodating as possible, and try very hard not to ever let it happen twice!
Dress Appropriately
You would think this would go without saying, but unfortunately it has to be said.  If your agent hasn’t given you some sort of dress code, just ask them.  They may request a certain style to fit their brand, the client’s preferences, or simply request a level of modesty.  
Represent the Agent
Distribute the Agent’s Collateral
Once you accept a gig that was booked through an agent, you are expected to act as a representative of their business, not your own.  This means you distribute their business cards (unless they say otherwise), and only display their company  name.  
When you are the one who has put in the time and expense of advertising, earning regular clients, and maintaining that relationship, then you are free to sell yourself.  Always ask your agent what their policy is when asked for a card, though this should be in their contract already. Many agents allow and even prefer you to write your name on their cards in case the client wants to request you specifically for a future gig!  
If you’re an artist who argues, “well I’m the one doing all the work and making THEM look good!” then you likely have not played the role of an agent yet!  As an artist who also experiences first hand the sheer volume of unpleasant grunt work involved in being an agent, I have a special appreciation for this and jump at the chance to work for and represent other agents at a fraction of my own hourly rate! Regardless of your feelings on whether an agent is worth their “cut” or not, the bottom line is, you are a independent contractor.  This means you are completely free to work on your own, and if you are unhappy with your agent’s policies or the rate that they are paying you, simply stop taking gigs from them. That’s the joy of being your own boss!
While I could go on and on, these are just a few tips on how to keep your relationship with your agent running smoothly.  The biggest tip though is to simply have open and honest communication with your agent about their own particular policies so everyone is clear about what their roles are!  As I mentioned, this is a series of articles on agents…next time I’ll touch on the subject of becoming an agent yourself! Until then, happy painting!